Phantasmagoria book essay

At the same time, I really admire her guts to take on this project, since it's so overwhelming and such an extensive area of research which she handled wonderfully leading the reader on a fantastic journey through time, space and diff Wow!

As much as the monster frightens us, we also want to conceptualize it so it wont remain so terrifying.

brevertons phantasmagoria pdf

This book is a mindblower. It breaks all boundaries and comes after you. At the same time, I really admire her guts to take on this project, since it's so overwhelming and such an extensive area of research which she handled wonderfully leading the reader on a fantastic journey through time, space and different views of the world and myths and language to make sense of the universe, life and ourselves.

Furthermore do adjectives, personal pronouns and prepositions miss on more than one occasion. I prefer the latter, because this compendium is not limited to objects, but also covers interesting people of the past, who are characters in and of themselves. It doesn't quite flow. I was ecstatic, because I love her work and this is a subject I'm specially interested in. Amazon The monster is a monster because its too much, too big, has too many eyes. Conclusion: Okay, it might have been a bit weird that I read, if we break it down to the core, an encyclopedia, but I thoroughly enjoyed it and will certainly use some of the information in future stories. The author often did a fair job of working in the stranger bypaths of natural history into his discussion while also, unfortunately, probably leaving many a reader confused about whether or not the Megaladon still exists and whether the manticore once lived on the earth like the wooly mammoth. Breverton does not go into why the Loch Ness monster may be impossible. Over a sequence of twenty-eight chapters, with over thirty illustrations in colour and black and white, Phantasmagoria thus tells an unexpected and often uncomfortable story about shifts in thought about consciousness and the individual person, from the first public waxworks portraits at the end ofthe eighteenth century to stories of hauntings, possession, and loss of self as in the case of the zombie, a popular figure of soulessness, in modern times. I've always been a fan of Warner, yet I only discovered this jewel a couple of months ago and had a lot of trouble getting my hands on a copy. A glance at my own shelves finds that they are bulging with cryptopedias and monsterpedias, ecologies of the unknown. It is rather dense though. While prone to leaving many readers believing, and reciting, tales of the irrational, I still enjoyed this approach to monsters and marvels and mysterious places. Although it presents itself as a kind of Baedekers of monsters, it also takes you to strange places, introduces you to bizarre historical characters, and even passes along a few of the stories an adept zoologist might use to wake up her drowsy undergraduates.

This book is more of a meditation on why humans obessess about the things we do in terms of life, the afterlife, and the end of all things.

Characters: One can say there are no characters in this book or one can say there are too many to sum up. This is unfortunate since so many readers will get caught up in the story of the 18th century occult master Count Cagliostro, or why Pliny and Isidore of Seville thought panthers were the sworn enemy of dragons or why the Venetian cartographer Albertinus De Virga had a shockingly accurate map of the African continent in the early 15th century.

the book of barely imagined beings

She brings a huge, huge amount of material and many brilliant For the latter, controversy in cases regarding monsters, aliens, cryptid This book at times tried to give the impression of a certain allegiance to factuality, which was betrayed by its giving credence to well-known nonsense and an obvious lack of research.

Unlike other reviewers, I found the book neither long nor disjointed. We want to get our minds around its many meanings, perhaps in hopes that it wont get its hands or claws?

Perhaps they should have spent a bit more time of the editing, because then it would have been perfect. She brings a huge, huge amount of material and many brilliant Given her other work, there should be no surprise that Warner takes a subject and crafts of it a marvellously Marina Warner doesn't hit you over the head with a thesaurus, a dictionary or an encyclopedia. For the latter, controversy in cases regarding monsters, aliens, cryptid This book at times tried to give the impression of a certain allegiance to factuality, which was betrayed by its giving credence to well-known nonsense and an obvious lack of research. This is not to say its especially helpful beyond providing a general introduction to any of the topics it describes, though. Shelves: literary-criticism-biography , myth-and-lore-criticism-history , religion , women-writers I didn't like this as much as I enjoy Warner's other work. It then fails to say anything at all about what an important figure in popular culture the werewolf has become. Phantasmagoria contains a single reference page that literally features only seven sources. Four of these are books by Breverton himself plus about the same number of websites. The mash-up between natural history, history and the legendary gives it the feeling of one of those old collections of wonder tales, or maybe even reading Herodotus and Livy both of whom get called in as expert witnesses now and again. I love Marina Warner's work, and I'm enjoying this - but it is like trying to grasp at clouds sometimes.

It mixes freely the trustworthy and untrustworthy. I own a copy of this book, but as such, you would have a hard time of convincing me to read it again.

Phantasmagoria book essay

The entry then completely ignores the important loup-garou trials in France, part of the general witchcraft panic that rattled Europe in the 16th century. This is an old, musty attic of a book, lots of secret treasure chests to open, old letters and diaries to rifle through. The result is that for more modern unknowns he does not come to the conclusion that myths and legends have an easily-obtained sociological or scientific explanation that doesn't include extraterrestrials or retained dinosaurs - many of his explanations for folk myths include one or the other. For the latter, controversy in cases regarding monsters, aliens, cryptids etc. It swims in the deep, dark waters of the unconscious. Breverton has done some thorough research and refers quite often to ancient writers such as Herodotus, Pliny the Elder and other historic writers and their contemporaries. It breaks all boundaries and comes after you. The book shows how this oftenembarrassing story connects with some of the important scientific discoveries of a fertile age, in psychology and physics. For now it is still very informative and a splendid collection of all that we cannot explain, but it lacks in the spelling and grammar department. While prone to leaving many readers believing, and reciting, tales of the irrational, I still enjoyed this approach to monsters and marvels and mysterious places.
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Breverton's Phantasmagoria by Terry Breverton