Presents from aunts in pakistan

Being half-English she feels restrained and uncomfortable.

Presents from aunts in pakistan

In England, she felt different because she was part Pakistani. And all the time the question begs - will she eventually wear this salwar kameez? It is 'glistening like an orange split open' a suitable simile which enhances the idea of excitement and goodness. When she puts the costume on there is no feeling of freedom or confidence. She now lives in England and so feels kind of stuck in between the two cultures. Consider glistening, lovely, radiant and conflict, fractured, throbbing. Confusion is almost inevitable when you consider that the clothes we wear can influence the way we think and act and see ourselves - this speaker is split between cultures and so feels a push me pull you effect. Her love of the colours and the materials, their radiance and splendour, is challenged by the fact that Pakistan has become 'a fractured land' full of divisions and violence. These suggest it is war-torn. Yet, she is not judgemental, perhaps because she is too young.

So essentially this poem is an exploration of cultural identity within a series of memories. The lines vary in length too which, with everything added together reflects the lack of stability and wavering emotions of the speaker.

hurricane hits england

Or there were beggars, sweeper-girls and I was there — staring through fretwork at the Shalimar Gardens. Reading this poem is a challenge because there are uneasy gaps between lines which cause pauses, both long and short. Subject The poem is about how Alvi felt as a young girl about her cultural identity.

presents from my aunts in pakistan full text

This use of visual detail is appropriate in a poem about how someone sees them self. Her memories of Pakistan are mixed; she recalls beggars and women who had to be screened from the males, a sign of a restricted society.

Salwar kameez

Her memories of Pakistan are mixed; she recalls beggars and women who had to be screened from the males, a sign of a restricted society. The gifts she receives, vividly coloured traditional Pakistani clothes, bangles and shoes, both delight and confuse her. You sense a battle going on within the psyche of the speaker; for or against this or that culture, torn between the old and the new, the past and the future. The presents do not fit in with the surroundings. In the first line note the Pakistani salwar kameez traditional costume of the Indian subcontinent,baggy trousers and long shirt or top and in contrast Marks and Spencers, the British retail company. So, here is the confused teenager searching for a definitive answer to her identity but never quite sure of her roots or her feelings. And I was there-of no fixed nationality She doesn't feel she belongs entirely to either culture. She feels attracted to Pakistan but also overwhelmed. Her love of the colours and the materials, their radiance and splendour, is challenged by the fact that Pakistan has become 'a fractured land' full of divisions and violence. As a teenager she notices the fashion change - same for the west and for the east - but the emphasis is on her identity being confused. This creates a slightly unsettled, fluid feel to the poem, reflecting the poet's feelings about her identity. Was alien in the sitting room She feels uncomfortable.

The more detail the reader receives about the gifts, the more the speaker's identity is challenged. The gifts include the traditional dress of Pakistan, the salwar kameez, a brightly coloured costume that makes the speaker feel inadequate. In the pictures and in her memories she can pictures her aunts.

You sense a battle going on within the psyche of the speaker; for or against this or that culture, torn between the old and the new, the past and the future.

Half caste poem

Was alien in the sitting room She feels uncomfortable. This use of visual detail is appropriate in a poem about how someone sees them self. She is attracted to the bright colours and patterns of the Pakistani fashions but she doesn't feel comfortable in the presents her aunts give her: 'My costume clung to me And I was all aflame. This reflects the strength of the culture and the connection the speaker has to Pakistan and her family there. It is set in the past, the speaker recalling the time she received the gifts. I wanted my parent's camel-skin lamp This is a meaningful time in this person's life. I could never be as lovely as those clothes She does think the clothes are wonderful, but feels she is inadequate, that she is not good enough for them. It is 'glistening like an orange split open' a suitable simile which enhances the idea of excitement and goodness. Style The poem uses a lot of visual detail to make us see the brightness and colour of Pakistan. The lines vary in length too which, with everything added together reflects the lack of stability and wavering emotions of the speaker.

Only the the final stanza does the speaker expound upon the negative aspects of her past life in Pakistan.

Rated 6/10 based on 114 review
Download
Presents from my aunts in pakistan